Will Meghan and Harry stop being the Duke and Duchess of Sussex?

Will Meghan and Harry stop being the Duke and Duchess of Sussex?

February 19, 2021

MEGHAN Markle and Prince Harry have given up their royal patronages – but they'll still be officially known as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

As part of the couple's agreement with the Queen last year, Meghan and Harry kept their His/Her Highness titles officially, but no longer use them.

Will Meghan and Harry stop being the Duke and Duchess of Sussex?

As explained in a January announcement, from Spring they will formally retain their titles of 'His/Her Royal Highness' but no longer actively use their 'HRH's.

Meghan, 39, and Prince Harry, 36, have kept their Duke and Duchess of Sussex titles since leaving the UK – which was dubbed "Megxit".

But in recent months, the couple have opted to simply introduce themselves by their first names.

And now Prince Harry won't be able to wear his military uniform at official events after being stripped of his honorary titles in the Megxit review.

In a statement, Buckingham Palace said: "The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have confirmed to Her Majesty The Queen that they will not be returning as working members of The Royal Family.

"Following conversations with The Duke, The Queen has written confirming that in stepping away from the work of The Royal Family it is not possible to continue with the responsibilities and duties that come with a life of public service.


Royal patronages: what positions do Harry and Meghan still hold?

What have they lost and what have they retained?

Harry:

Former soldier Harry, who served on the frontline in Afghanistan, is no longer the Captain General of the Royal Marines, Honorary Air Force Commandant of the Royal Air Force Base Honington, or Honorary Commodore-in-Chief of the Royal Naval Commands' Small Ships and Diving.

He has also had to relinquish his role as president of The Queen's Commonwealth Trust.

The duke will no longer be patron of the Rugby Football Union and the Rugby Football League – roles which he took over from the Queen.

Harry is also no longer patron of the London Marathon Charitable Trust.

The role was on a three-year term, which was renewed twice, covering nine years. It came to an end in January, and it was decided it would not be renewed.

He so far retains the following private patronages or presidencies: African Parks, Dolen Cymru, the Henry van Straubenzee Memorial Fund, Invictus Games, MapAction, Rhino Conservation Botswana charity, Sentebale, and WellChild.

It is not yet known whether Harry will retain his two other rugby-related patronages of the Rugby Football Union All Schools Programme and the Rugby Football Union Injured Players Foundation.

Meghan:

The Queen handed Meghan two royal patronages in 2019, but the duchess loses these: The Royal National Theatre and the Association of Commonwealth Universities.

Meghan also has to give up her role as vice-president of The Queen's Commonwealth Trust.

She keeps her two private patronages: Smart Works and animal charity Mayhew.

"The honorary military appointments and Royal patronages held by The Duke and Duchess will therefore be returned to Her Majesty, before being redistributed among working members of The Royal Family.

"While all are saddened by their decision, The Duke and Duchess remain much loved members of the family."

The Duke of Sussex was said to be "upset" at the prospect of losing his titles and patronages – with the palace today confirming he would no longer hold the honorary positions.

Harry and Meghan – who last week announced they were expecting another baby – were reportedly "resigned" to losing their roles.

The couple had around 18 royal and private patronages until today's announcement but have not returned to the UK for 11 months.

What did Meghan Markle and Prince Harry say in their statement?

Responding to the statement from Buckingham Palace that the pair wouldn't be coming back, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex have released their own statement on social media. 

It read: “As evidenced by their work over the past year, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex remain committed to their duty and service to the UK and around the world, and have offered their continued support to the organisations they have represented regardless of official role."

“We can all live a life of service. Service is universal,” it added.


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