Public believe taxes MORE likely to rise under the Tories than Labour

Public believe taxes MORE likely to rise under the Tories than Labour

October 8, 2021

Tories now seen as the high tax party: Public believe they are MORE likely to increase under the Conservatives than Labour

  • 64% of the public believe Tories will put up taxes – but just 56% fear Labour move
  • Conservatives and Labour are now tied on which would be best at handling tax 
  • PM facing growing concern over his plans for economy and social care 

The Conservatives are no longer seen as the party of low taxes with voters saying Boris Johnson’s party is more likely to put them up than Labour.

A poll by YouGov found that more people believe the Tories would raise taxes if they were re-elected than believe Sir Starmer’s opposition would push them higher, by 64 per cent to 56 per cent.

Additionally the poll found that the Conservatives and Labour are now tied on which would be best at handling tax.

In a potential double blow for Mr Johnson, the shock poll was conducted before his Conservative Party Conference speech in which he defended his tax and spending plans.

Mr Johnson received a mixed reception for his first big set piece to the faithful since winning an historic majority in 2019.

One Cabinet minister said they ‘hate’ the huge tax rises being brought in to bail out the NHS and social care. 

A poll by YouGov found that more people believe the Tories would raise taxes if they were re-elected than believe Sir Starmer’s opposition would push them higher, by 64 per cent to 56 per cent.

In a potential double blow for Mr Johnson, the shock poll was conducted before his Conservative Party Conference speech in which he defended his tax and spending plans.

Additionally the poll found that the Conservatives and Labour are now tied on which would be best at handling tax.

But they suggested Mr Johnson will need to ease the burden before he asks for another mandate from voters. 

Businesses warned that he has failed to give any details of how his ‘Level Up’ vision will work, accusing him of demanding they soak up massive cost rises without any help. 

There is also growing alarm at threat of ‘stagflation’, as soaring energy prices and supply chain chaos push up inflation while economic growth appears to be stalling. 

One Cabinet member said there will be ‘pain’ as the country is weaned off cheap immigrant labour and the fortunes of left-behind communities are turned around. 

Mr Johnson is also feeling a hit from the electorate from his plan announced last month to raise National Insurance contributions (NICs) to pay for social care reforms.

The move will hit millions of workers in their pay packet, while leaving pensioners and domestic landlords largely untouched untouched.

Dismissing criticism over huge tax hikes to bail out the NHS and social care, Mr Johnson used his speech in Manchester to claim his predecessor Margaret Thatcher would not have kept borrowing after the ‘meteorite’ of the pandemic left national debt over £2trillion. 

He also summoned the spirit of Churchill and US Open tennis champion Emma Raducanu as he spelt out his determination for Britain to be a ‘trailblazer’. 

But the UK government’s borrowing costs rose to the highest level since May 2019 yesterday, as markets took fright at the prospect of inflation going even higher. 

In further worrying signs, the latest PMI figures suggested the economic recovery stalled last month – raising the threat of so-called ‘stagflation’.    

Meanwhile, the CBI warned that the premier’s determination to drive up wages would put the country on a ‘pathway to higher prices’ unless he has comes up with a way to boost productivity.   

Matthew Lesh of Thatcherite think-tank the Adam Smith institute said: ‘Boris’ rhetoric was bombastic but vacuous and economically illiterate. 

‘Boris is hamstringing the labour market, raising taxes on a fragile economy and shying away from meaningful planning reform. Shortages and rising prices cannot simply be blustered away with rhetoric about migrants.’ 

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