Purdue University pays controversial 'White Fragility' author $7G for 90-minute virtual event

Purdue University pays controversial 'White Fragility' author $7G for 90-minute virtual event

March 5, 2021

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Purdue University paid thousands of dollars to host “White Fragility” author Robin DiAngelo for a lecture under an honors college program.

Public records obtained by Fox News show that the taxpayer-funded university paid the controversial author $7,000 for a Thursday night lecture sponsored by Purdue’s Honors College Visiting Scholars program.

The event page described DiAngelo as “an American author, consultant, and facilitator working in the fields of critical discourse analysis and whiteness studies.”

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“In 2011 she coined the term White Fragility in an academic article which has influenced the international dialogue on race,” the university wrote on the event page. “She has numerous publications and books.”

DiAngelo recently came under fire when clips of her from a promotion of her book “White Fragility” appeared in a now-pulled LinkedIn training seminar.

The seminar received massive backlash online for instructing employees to “be less White” and “less oppressive” after it was leaked by a Coca-Cola employee. DiAngelo distanced herself from the training seminar amid the backlash. 

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Purdue University did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment on the decision to hire DiAngelo.

Columbia University associate professor John McWhorter torched DiAngelo’s book in a piece in The Atlantic from July of last year, saying the controversial book is “about how to make certain educated white readers feel better about themselves.”

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“DiAngelo’s outlook rests upon a depiction of Black people as endlessly delicate poster children within this self-gratifying fantasy about how white America needs to think,” McWhorter wrote.

“Or, better, stop thinking. Her answer to white fragility, in other words, entails an elaborate and pitilessly dehumanizing condescension toward Black people.”

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