Disneyland Adds Health And Safety Protocols In Hopes Of Reopening Soon

Disneyland Adds Health And Safety Protocols In Hopes Of Reopening Soon

October 10, 2020

Disneyland is hoping to convince Gov. Gavin Newsom that the happiest place on earth is also one of the safest places in California.

The theme park has adopted new health and safety recommendations in an effort to spur officials to allow it to welcome back guests, even as Newsom claimed this week that the state is in no hurry to reopen it.

The health and safety recommendations came from the Orange County Health Care Agency and Anaheim officials, who toured Disneyland and Disney California Adventure last week to view the COVID-19 measures adopted by the theme parks, the O.C. Register reported.

They include physical distancing measures and plastic shields on rides.

“On the rides, you’ll see much more plastic shielding in place, wherever folks might come into contact with each other in fairly close proximity,” said Mike Lyster, a spokeman for the City of Anaheim, to KTLA TV. “There are floor markings everywhere that will keep my party away from another party, basically keeping that 6 feet of distance between them.”

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There will also be a “significant amount of open space” between parties when they are loaded onto rides, he said.

The other protocols include additional hand sanitizing stations, ground markings to ensure proper separation, and adding Spanish language signs with information on the COVID-19 health and safety measures. The park previously said it would require masks and temperature checks on its guests.

Despite the added measures, California officials seem in no hurry to issue guidelines on reopening or set a date when the gates can swing hope.

Newsom said earlier this week that new rules aren’t coming anytime soon.

“We feel there’s no hurry in putting out guidelines,” the governor said. “We’re going to be led by a health-first framework and … we’re going to be stubborn about it.”

Meanwhile, the city of Anaheim faces a likely $100 million budget shortfall, a good deal of it generated by usage taxes, and the local and regional economy is struggling with the lack of tourist money.

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